Posts Tagged ‘Living’

Contemporary Country House for Luxury Living in Chile

contemporary country house for luxury living 2  Contemporary Country House for Luxury Living in Chile

contemporary country house for luxury living 1  Contemporary Country House for Luxury Living in Chile

Designed by Felipe Assadi + Francisca Pulido studio this contemporary country house is located in Calera Tango, Santiago, Chile. It’s built for a happy family on 4.5 Ha area with fruit trees only in one hour drive from capital. Concrete foundation wall that what elevates house from the ground includes a swimming pool and a basement. The first volume consist of public spaces like living and dining rooms. This volume is mostly covered by large gazing or with Larch wood. The second volume at the same time is a glass-and-concrete box which features more private sleeping areas. Glass used in the glazing is a thermo-pane glass with a green dye, which filters out ultraviolet rays and creates the greenhouse effect. Folding windows at the top around the perimeter of the house develops a better ventilation. [Felipe Assadi + Francisca Pulido]

contemporary country house for luxury living 3  Contemporary Country House for Luxury Living in Chile

contemporary country house for luxury living 4 Contemporary Country House for Luxury Living in Chile

contemporary country house for luxury living 5 Contemporary Country House for Luxury Living in Chile

LSarc’s Randall House Bridges Indoors and Outdoors

randallhouse lead  LSarc’s Randall House Bridges Indoors and Outdoors

One of our favorite projects from last weekend’s AIA Homes Tours was the Randall House in Glen Park, by LSarc design team. The site, typical of San Francisco contours, slopes nearly four stories from front to back making the rear lower floors a challenge to daylight. The architects did a stunning job of working with this difficult site while reusing existing construction materials, incorporating FSC certified timber, and creating a healthy interior environment through the use of sustainable materials.

Perhaps the most dramatic feature of the home is the internal four story light shaft, which also houses the stair and provides natural ventilation via the ‘chimney effect’. A continuous structural metal ribbon floats the stair up through the shaft and further connects all four floor plates of this vertically oriented home.